13 Great Hispanic Girl Names

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Some of the most common Hispanic girl names, from Sofia to Isabella, are popular in the U.S. as well. However, there are still plenty of lovely Latin girl names that aren’t red hot here; these lesser-known gems are perfect for parents looking for something a little off the beaten path.

Sofia

This ultrapopular baby name is #4 in the U.S. with the spelling Sophia, and #14 for this spelling. It means “wisdom.”

Isabella

One of the most popular Hispanic girl names in the U.S., Isabella is currently in the top 5. It’s the Spanish form of Elizabeth and shares its meaning, “consecrated to God.” It’s been a popular royal name in Europe

Valentina

This feminization of the saint’s name Valentine is currently just outside the top 100 in the U.S., and means “strength.”

Camila

Currently in the top 40 here in the U.S., Camila means “ceremonial attendant.”

Martina

This feminization of Martin means “warlike,” and while it’s not superpopular here in the U.S., it’s among the most popular Latin girl names in Mexico.

Ximena

One of the more unique Hispanic girl names, Ximena is currently in the top 150, and has a slew of Latin American stars as namesakes.

Luciana

This lovely way to get to the nickname Lucy means “light.” Luciana is very popular in both Italian and Spanish circles.

Renata

Could this name get a boost after its use for Laura Dern’s character in Big Little Lies? Renata means “reborn,” and could be a unique way to honor a Renee in your family.

Elena

This Spanish variation on Helen means “bright, shining light,” and is currently just inside the top 100.

Antonella

One of the more off-the-beaten-path Latin girl names, Antonella means “first born,” and comes with a popular nickname—Ella.

Catalina

This popular Latin girl name is a variation on Catherine, and shares its meaning—“pure.”

Alejandra

A female variation on Alexander (or Alejandro!), Alejandra means “defending men.”

Guadalupe

A place name from Mexico, Guadalupe has a poetic meaning: “river of black stones.”

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